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Retention Bonus

definition and explanation

Synonyms:

retention pay, stay bonus

What is

Retention Bonus

A retention bonus is a sum of money that an employer offers to an employee in order to encourage them to stay with the company for a certain period of time.

Retention Bonus

explained

A retention bonus is a type of financial incentive offered by an employer to encourage an employee to remain with the company for a set period of time. The bonus may be paid in a lump sum or as an ongoing payment, and is typically awarded after the employee has completed a certain number of years with the company. The amount of the bonus is typically based on the employee's salary and position within the company.

The purpose of a retention bonus is to keep key employees from leaving the company during times of change or transition. This may include periods of downsizing, restructuring, or mergers and acquisitions. Retention bonuses can also be used to keep employees from leaving for a competitor.

Retention bonuses are typically offered to employees who have specific skills or knowledge that would be difficult to replace. For example, a company may offer a retention bonus to a key member of its research and development team. The company may also offer retention bonuses to employees who have been with the company for a long time and have acquired a deep knowledge of the company's products, processes, and culture.

Retention bonuses are typically offered in addition to the employee's regular salary and benefits. In some cases, the bonus may be paid out over time, typically in equal installments. For example, a company may offer a retention bonus of $5,000 to an employee, to be paid in equal installments over the course of five years.

The terms of a retention bonus may be outlined in an employment contract or in a letter of offer. The bonus may be paid in a lump sum or as an ongoing payment, and is typically awarded after the employee has completed a certain number of years with the company. The amount of the bonus is typically based on the employee's salary and position within the company.

Retention bonuses are typically offered to key employees who are essential to the company's success. For example, a company may offer a retention bonus to a key member of its research and development team. The company may also offer retention bonuses to employees who have been with the company for a long time and have acquired a deep knowledge of the company's products, processes, and culture.

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